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Cianchi Pens - River Range

The Cianchi River Range celebrates the Tasmanian environment.  Named after local rivers, the pens commemorate the landscape and the people who storied these places.

The Franklin

Perhaps the best known Australian River, the Franklin was named after Governor of Van Diemen’s Land, Sir John Franklin. In 1842, with his wife Lady Jane, and a small team of convicts and officers, Sir John completed an arduous journey from Lake St Clair to Macquarie Harbour, crossing the Franklin River. 

The river made national headlines in the 1980s during a passionate battle between conservationists and pro-dammers.  The State Government’s decision to dam the last of Tasmania’s truly wild rivers was overthrown by a Federal high court ruling.  The Franklin flows today through steep ravines and temperate rainforest.

Top of the River Range, the Franklin combines polish with performance.

Available as a capped rollerball or fountain. Available in a choice of natural Tasmanian timbers or in stained Tasmanian Eucalypt burl.

Pictures of the Franklin

The Arthur

Named after George Arthur, the Arthur River flows through north-west Tasmania. The river’s namesake was Australia’s longest serving governor. Arriving in Van Diemen’s Land 1824, Arthur set about to reform the convict system, creating island wide surveillance and a regulated ‘snakes and ladders’ for offenders.  Though considered morally arrogant he was also known for rigorous administration and his aversion to rum. In addition Arthur compiled and made available to prisoners the biggest library in the southern hemisphere.

The Arthur is strong, efficient and dependable.

Available as a twist pencil, ballpoint or gel. Alternatively as a capped rollerball or fountain pen in your choice of natural Tasmanian timbers or in stained Tasmanian Eucalypt burl.

The Esperance

Bruny d’Entrecasteaux’s French expedition first visited Tasmanian waters in 1792 in Recherche and Esperance. Most notably the expedition planted a garden of vegetables and European seed at Recherche Bay in the island’s south. The French returned in 1793, further developing their records. Many coastal features were named and charted including the Esperance River.

The Esperance is stylish and reliable.

Available as a ballpoint or gel. Available in a choice of natural Tasmanian timbers or in stained Tasmanian Eucalypt burl.
 

The Clark

Huon pine lines the river banks of Tasmania’s west coast rivers, including the Clark.  Endemic to the island, Huon pine’s richness in oil retards the rotting process.  Fallen timber can lie on the forest floor for hundreds of years and still be perfectly sound.  Yesterday’s Huon piners explored rivers and tributaries, felling timber and floating the bounty to downstream sawpits. The Clark River flows into Macquarie Harbour at Kelly Basin.

For a well weighted and comfortable pen in Huon Pine try the Clark.

Available as a capped rollerball or fountain. In plain, featured Huon Pine or stained.
 

The Derwent

Familiar to Hobartians, the Derwent River flows from Lake St Clair on a 182km journey to Storm Bay. Though many stories have been lost, a number of important Aboriginal sites are known along the Derwent Estuary.

Solid, strong and reliable is the Derwent.

Available as a twist 0.7mm pencil, ballpoint or gel in a choice of natural Tasmanian timbers.
 

The Pieman

Alexander Pearce was a pie man, a convict and a cannibal.  In 1822 with fellow villains he escaped from Macquarie Harbour on the west coast.  Only Pearce arrived in Hobarton. Ultimately he was hanged, but the Pieman River remains a tannin-stained tribute to a hard, yet pragmatic man.

The Pieman is a simple and robust addition to the River Range.

Available as a click ballpoint, gel or pencil in a choice of natural Tasmanian timbers.
 
 
 
 

 

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Copyright 2006 Andy Cianchi | all rights reserved | last edited 26/11/2006